Social Media Metrics – Comments

I’ve just finished reading this article:

Ask SMT: Are there too many social media metrics? Which do you find most valuable?

This was definitely an interesting read for me, because a lot of the baseline metrics that I I’ve looked at when reporting on social media just didn’t seem relevant, especially when reporting to senior staff.

One theme here is that level of interaction is important, and I think it’s more important than reach, even though reach numbers can look much more impressive. Rather than¬† the number of people that might have potentially looked at your content, it’s the number of people that read/watched stuff, shared it, talked about it, talked to you about it, that really count.

A number of the interviewed commenters in this had the point of metrics needing to be relevant to your specific goals and your organisation – this is a helpful comment in that you shouldn’t be exactly following other people’s plan, however there are some baselines that need to be followed – Return on Investment for paid media was one, and real bascis like number of followers is absolutely another.

Blog Reading Nostalgia

Over the last few days, I’ve been making a massive effort to read other blogs on WordPress. I went through my long-neglected reading list and ended up removing most of my follows from blogs that hadn’t been updated in years, then went searching for some new ones. 
Searching the Social Media and Digital culture tags, I noticed pretty much right away that the majority of the posts were from blogs created for school/university courses on social media, covering and discussing the exact same kind of content that I did back in the first year of this blog. 

It was surprisingly nostalgic to read through these posts, seeing people discovering (for the first time) the academic topics and issues that I studied and wrote about at length. 

It’s interesting that many of the same books, papers and researchers were referenced as when I was at university, despite the massive changes in social media over the last few years. It seems like it’s still quite a niche subject in research circles. Still, it’s prompted me to start looking at some of the ideas referenced in a new light, and perhaps to go back and do some reading up. 

Notes from the #Oiconf Feed

So the Online Influencers Conference was going on in Bristol a few days ago. Sadly, I wasn’t there, but fortunately it was being attended by a crowd of people who are sharing good stuff to the Twitter hashtag #OiConf, and the OiConf account itself was full of roundups etc.

I immediately made some phone notes with the best top tweets and made a few notes of my own, so I’m finally getting around to throwing them up here.

I’ve noticed this too, it’s why Facebook videos now only count views of 3 seconds or longer, any less than that and the ‘view’ wasn’t really a view at all.

Definitely one to bear of mind when working with brands – there’s a ‘day of’ for pretty much every day of the year now, (this post from Hootsuite is a good resource, but there’s no point in celebrating the

Influencers and ‘authenticity’ is such as fascinating topic. The internet is full of content creators who are making a living off balancing a carefully cultivated brand and being ‘real’ to their fans, especially when working with sponsored content (I wrote about this years ago in a blog post that barely scratches the surface, it might be time for some follow-up work.)

I’m a bit scared by this last one – but it’s something I’ve since been reading up more up. After all, with the rise of AI in retail, customer service etc., this starts to sound a bit less like hyperbole and actually pretty plausible. In fact, it’s been recently suggested that AI in customer service frontline could be quite beneficial in preventing burn-out in the workforce. On the other hand, if not handled it will remove a lot of lower-income jobs with no alternatives.

Hootsuite: Notes from the A to Z of Social Media Strategy

These notes are from this free course provided by Hootsuite, which I mentioned that I would be starting to work through in this previous post.

Companies are rushing to catch up on digital output, which means that digital and non-digital often aren’t in sync with each other as far as goals are concerned.

  • You need a unified and sound social media strategy.
  • A unified strategy will help a company achieve it’s goals better (see this post for notes on marketing goals.)

It needs to clarify and provide guidance, as well as adherence to best practice.

Personal Note: This has applied to all of the social media accounts that I have managed over the past few years:

  • To ensure that company staff changes over time won’t affect the social media platforms
  • To lay out roles and responsibilities
  • To outline policies and appropriate uses.
  • Also particular tone and style – not doing this can confuse followers and may make it obvious to the public when different people post.

Components of the Strategy

  • Do an audit of your accounts
  • Outline your objectives
  • Figure out your brand and voice – a style guide for social media is something that I’ve seen before, and may be a good idea
  • Also need to set up measurements and goals, and figure out what does and doesn’t work.

The analysis of your existing social media is the first thing. Your social platform engagement should be logged frequently to see clear growth/decline/changes over time.

  • Look closely at your competition!
  • What strategies work for them and how can you incorporate them into your own?

Important point –¬†Be Honest!¬†– or you won’t have the best answers to move forward.

That last point would be bolded more if I could, since it can be too easy to put a positive spin on your figures, especially if presenting them to senior colleagues or clients. But it’s important to remember, if they aren’t as social media savvy as you, they’re relying on you to provide them with clear guidance for their long-term ideas. And if they are, they’re likely to know what they’re looking at… even if it’s not the answers that they wanted, this is the first step to social media improvement, which is the most important point.

The impersonality of Twitter Moments

Twitter moments are impersonal.
I discovered that this weekend when my tweet of a political event was included in twitter’s news coverage. After a short while the number of notifications, while nowhere beat viral levels, was starting to annoy me, so I turned them off until this morning. When I finally turned them back on, I had a shed load of likes and retweets, but also a couple of replies. I braced myself for the likely rude comments. 
Instead, while the comments were people opposed to the event, they weren’t addressing those comments to me, just generally commenting. It struck me that while my account etc is still visible in the scrolling newsfeed, Twitter moments make it seem less like it’s coming from a personal account (unless it’s someone extremely famous) and people are more inclined to treat it that way. Some food for thought when using Twitter moments as a tool.

Notes: Marketing Essentials Part 2

Whilst setting up to start studying Hootsuite academy, I found in my notebook some further¬†comments¬†that I’d written on Marketing Essentials (my first set of notes are written up here.) Recently I’ve been trying to go back over old blog posts and refresh what I’ve learned, so I thought I’d better get these notes down before I forget about them!

Marketing Strategies

Few organisations can take advantage of and address every marketing opportunity that comes along and they simply won’t have the time, staff and resources to do so. Therefore organisations have to use market research to know how to focus their marketing programme, and the specialist skills that they will need their staff to have. Staff and their skill sets are particularly important in this area.

The¬†marketing strategy¬†is different to the¬†corporate strategy – this defines the overarching agenda for the whole organisation, whereas the marketing strategy lays out the best way for an organisation to use it’s resources to achieve it’s goals.

This is broken down into specific areas which Marketing Strategies refers to as Strategic Business Units or SBUs. The exact definition of an SBU is according to this book is:

A division, product line or other profit centre within a parent company

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So, having gone over that I’ll need to jump back into the rest of that book chapter and make enough notes for a part three post, but firstly it’s back to the Hootsuite course. Much of the course seems to be videos-based, which much like my Google for Business posts during last year’s Blaugust should mean that I’ll also be able to do a few reflective blogposts soon enough.

 

Quick Blog: Learning Updates

I haven’t done any Future Learn courses for a while, but I’ve decided to try and kick start some learning in other areas.

I’ve continued to work on my French via Duolingo, and it’s a slow process but I’m able to make it part of my morning commute. The XP system in Duolingo is a great example of Gamification, as I’ve got a daily goal to hit and I’m mostly managing it.

After originally not getting into Highbrow, I’ve decided to give it another try, and I’ve realised that the problem last time was probably the course content. I’ve started something very different – a email course that sends you and explains a short new business case study every day. The case studies come from University courses, and while they’re too short for it to feel worthwhile writing a blog on it right now, I definitely feel that I’m picking up ideas from them. Once I’ve done the whole course, I might write a post reflecting on it.

So the next thing I’m looking at is Hootsuite Academy. These seem like much more involved courses, but they’ll probably be much more valuable to me career-wise in the long run. It seems like there are online quizzes/exams at the end of each course, but unlike FutureLearn, they can be started and finished at any time, so while I’ll be making sure to put sure time aside for it on the regular basis, I can also take my time to really get in depth with the course materials. I’m printing out the first pdf. of questions as I write, and I’ll see how this goes.