#TEC2018 – Takeaways from the Tessitura European Conference

I’ve spent the last two days at the Tessitura European Conference (which conveniently happened to be partly based at the venue where I work, and partly just around the corner!) Tessitura is a CRM system designed for event venues and attractions to sell tickets and collect data (and do a whole load of other stuff) and it is integral to a large part of my job in arts marketing.

Unlike the AMA conference earlier this year (you can find my posts about it here) TEC 2018 was partly about marketing and development techniques and ideas, and partly about the actual technical nitty-gritty of the Tessitura system. I tried to go to a range of sessions covering both sides, and not necessarily limit myself to the sessions that directly related to my current role.

The big star of the conference was the unveiling of Tessitura’s brand new analytics tool, and we got to have several demonstrations of it as well as a hand-ons demo. The big appeal of the analytics tool is the many, many varying ways in which you can visualise your data, and how much you can show from a particular audience segment.

There were two other big themes this year, at least in the sessions that I attended. The first leads on directly from analytics – the importance of not making assumptions about your audience. This is something probably all marketing teams are guilty of – assuming that ‘we know this audience and we know what they like’. Yes, analysing the data will often lead you to the same conclusion that you made in the first place, but often new data (or even non-new data) can be overlooked, meaning that either you aren’t engaging at all with a particular part of your audience, or you’ve lumped them in with another segment, and are using marketing material that either doesn’t work or will actively turn them off from your product.

The second was about new trends in dynamic pricing. Other industries have been using algorithmic pricing for years based on supply and demand, but in arts and events, there is often an assumption that it is a bad idea because ‘the audience won’t like it’ or ‘it will devalue our product.’ That isn’t to say that no-one does dynamic marketing, but instead it is done on the same kind of audience assumptions as above, manually and with a certain amount of gut feeling. The thing about gut feeling is that, unlike in Hollywood and trashy crime novels, it is very often wrong. Algorithms can calculate and forecast based on far more variables than the human brain can realistically cope with, especially across many events! This is a fascinating bit of technology that I think we’ll be seeing a lot more of in various forms.

Anyway, my next job is to write up all of the notes that I’ve taken over the past few days, and I’ll try to get those up here soon!

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3 thoughts on “#TEC2018 – Takeaways from the Tessitura European Conference

  1. Pingback: Tessitura European Conference – Session Notes Day One | Clare@Blog
  2. Pingback: Tessitura European Conference – Session Notes Day Two | Clare@Blog
  3. Pingback: It’s December – somehow… | Clare@Blog

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