LinkedIn’s Big Moment, plus Hashtags

So this is a post I started writing a week or so ago, before I went away. Therefore the bit about Hootchat is a little old by tweet standards, but the content is still relevant!

Over the last few months, I’ve been making an effort to follow Hootsuite’s #Hootchat conversations on Twitter – sadly the time zone differences mean it’s difficult for me to join in live!

Some days back, I found the below question popping up on my feed, and a number of the answers were pretty interesting.

https://twitter.com/hootsuite/status/954084776142663681

Although LinkedIn has always been around, occupying that professional  networking niche (the one that Google+ tried and failed to capitalise on) it appears that as a new digital generation has matured, it has become more and more relevant, whilst Twitter and Facebook have begun to fall by the wayside.

In other news, I’m enjoying an accidental hashtag mix-up on my Twitter feed; one which proves you should always check how a hashtag is used (and if it is a year-related hashtag, check it with the previous year in to see what might be around.) Otherwise, you might end up in the same position as the International Communications Association, whose choice of #ica18 for their conference is causing some confusion when that hashtag is dominated by potential entrants for the 2018 International Cheese Awards…

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Twitter Moments have a problem

A very little thought that I’ve had for some time regarding Twitter’s use of user tweets in their newsfeed and moments.

So, I’ve had a few tweets used, and generally they were political in nature, which unsurprisingly generated a small amount of insults and abuse. Not a huge amount, and nothing that I couldn’t ignore or block, but it occurred to me that a random comment on current events out of thousands could be broadcast to the world and to a much larger amount of that abuse.

Now, I decided that I wanted to remove my tweet from one of these moments. Seems like it should be an easy thing to do, right? Well, after a lot of googling, I discovered from Twitter’s own help site that in order to remove yourself from a Twitter moment, you have to block the account that created it.

This may be fine if you are are in a Twitter moment that someone has created with malicious intent, but if the moment is created by the @twittermoments account itself, you presumably have to block the main source of curated Twitter news in order to remove yourself from a moment? Plus, this is not made obvious at all. Overall, it seems like something Twitter should look into changing for usability purposes, especially related to the changes that Twitter has promised to make to it’s abuse policies.