Blog Reading Nostalgia

Over the last few days, I’ve been making a massive effort to read other blogs on WordPress. I went through my long-neglected reading list and ended up removing most of my follows from blogs that hadn’t been updated in years, then went searching for some new ones. 
Searching the Social Media and Digital culture tags, I noticed pretty much right away that the majority of the posts were from blogs created for school/university courses on social media, covering and discussing the exact same kind of content that I did back in the first year of this blog. 

It was surprisingly nostalgic to read through these posts, seeing people discovering (for the first time) the academic topics and issues that I studied and wrote about at length. 

It’s interesting that many of the same books, papers and researchers were referenced as when I was at university, despite the massive changes in social media over the last few years. It seems like it’s still quite a niche subject in research circles. Still, it’s prompted me to start looking at some of the ideas referenced in a new light, and perhaps to go back and do some reading up. 

Notes from the #Oiconf Feed

So the Online Influencers Conference was going on in Bristol a few days ago. Sadly, I wasn’t there, but fortunately it was being attended by a crowd of people who are sharing good stuff to the Twitter hashtag #OiConf, and the OiConf account itself was full of roundups etc.

I immediately made some phone notes with the best top tweets and made a few notes of my own, so I’m finally getting around to throwing them up here.

I’ve noticed this too, it’s why Facebook videos now only count views of 3 seconds or longer, any less than that and the ‘view’ wasn’t really a view at all.

Definitely one to bear of mind when working with brands – there’s a ‘day of’ for pretty much every day of the year now, (this post from Hootsuite is a good resource, but there’s no point in celebrating the

Influencers and ‘authenticity’ is such as fascinating topic. The internet is full of content creators who are making a living off balancing a carefully cultivated brand and being ‘real’ to their fans, especially when working with sponsored content (I wrote about this years ago in a blog post that barely scratches the surface, it might be time for some follow-up work.)

I’m a bit scared by this last one – but it’s something I’ve since been reading up more up. After all, with the rise of AI in retail, customer service etc., this starts to sound a bit less like hyperbole and actually pretty plausible. In fact, it’s been recently suggested that AI in customer service frontline could be quite beneficial in preventing burn-out in the workforce. On the other hand, if not handled it will remove a lot of lower-income jobs with no alternatives.