Hootsuite: Notes from the A to Z of Social Media Strategy

These notes are from this free course provided by Hootsuite, which I mentioned that I would be starting to work through in this previous post.

Companies are rushing to catch up on digital output, which means that digital and non-digital often aren’t in sync with each other as far as goals are concerned.

  • You need a unified and sound social media strategy.
  • A unified strategy will help a company achieve it’s goals better (see this post for notes on marketing goals.)

It needs to clarify and provide guidance, as well as adherence to best practice.

Personal Note: This has applied to all of the social media accounts that I have managed over the past few years:

  • To ensure that company staff changes over time won’t affect the social media platforms
  • To lay out roles and responsibilities
  • To outline policies and appropriate uses.
  • Also particular tone and style – not doing this can confuse followers and may make it obvious to the public when different people post.

Components of the Strategy

  • Do an audit of your accounts
  • Outline your objectives
  • Figure out your brand and voice – a style guide for social media is something that I’ve seen before, and may be a good idea
  • Also need to set up measurements and goals, and figure out what does and doesn’t work.

The analysis of your existing social media is the first thing. Your social platform engagement should be logged frequently to see clear growth/decline/changes over time.

  • Look closely at your competition!
  • What strategies work for them and how can you incorporate them into your own?

Important point – Be Honest! – or you won’t have the best answers to move forward.

That last point would be bolded more if I could, since it can be too easy to put a positive spin on your figures, especially if presenting them to senior colleagues or clients. But it’s important to remember, if they aren’t as social media savvy as you, they’re relying on you to provide them with clear guidance for their long-term ideas. And if they are, they’re likely to know what they’re looking at… even if it’s not the answers that they wanted, this is the first step to social media improvement, which is the most important point.

The impersonality of Twitter Moments

Twitter moments are impersonal.
I discovered that this weekend when my tweet of a political event was included in twitter’s news coverage. After a short while the number of notifications, while nowhere beat viral levels, was starting to annoy me, so I turned them off until this morning. When I finally turned them back on, I had a shed load of likes and retweets, but also a couple of replies. I braced myself for the likely rude comments. 
Instead, while the comments were people opposed to the event, they weren’t addressing those comments to me, just generally commenting. It struck me that while my account etc is still visible in the scrolling newsfeed, Twitter moments make it seem less like it’s coming from a personal account (unless it’s someone extremely famous) and people are more inclined to treat it that way. Some food for thought when using Twitter moments as a tool.